Weird barrel gunk inside new wolf a1 upper, help

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SS73
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Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2020 8:14 pm
Country: USA
Location: Va

Thu Feb 13, 2020 8:54 pm

Hi everyone,

Need some help here!

I got the wolf a1 upper when it first came out years ago, never had a chance to shoot it. Recently I took it out and and gave it a good cleaning before I was going to take it out to the range.

Everything looked ok , still covered in its factory oil, but when I clean the barrel I noticed a white dried gum-like substance inside the barrel (cover half of the chamber, and 2 lines going half way down the barrel at 12-o-clock and 6-o-clock, and half covers a 1’’ section near the end of the barrel). It feels rough/sticky and will catch the lint from my patches and q-tips.

I didn’t think too much of it, and proceed to attempt cleaning it out. I tried the usual clp + brush + patch didn’t do a thing.

So far, I have tried, clp, hoppes 9, break cleaner, kroil, and even 100% acetone. Even soaking It overnight has little effect on the “lines” and the muzzle end gunk, but was able to clean the chamber up to 70% with the help of an ar chamber brush.

I have never encountered this before, just wondering if any of you guys have experienced this. Any suggestions? As of now I’m beat, I’m about to take it to the range and put some rounds through the barrel to see if it would push/melt this stuff off.

Any suggestions would help, Thanks in advance.


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Arkane
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Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2017 12:35 pm

Thu Feb 13, 2020 11:13 pm

If you're sure it's not bad machining but some kind of dried up lube/gunk chuck a bore brush on a rod into a drill and shoot the barrel with seafom deep creep and slowly advance the rod into the barrel while spinning it, hitting it with lube to keep it from getting too fouled. When I got my first upper after a good initial cleaning I still had some issues with stuck cases. A good scrubbing with a bore brush on a road in the drill cleaned it right up. On my second and subsequent uppers I did this before going to the range and had no problems. Typical cleaning rod rules apply.
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SS73
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Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2020 8:14 pm
Country: USA
Location: Va

Fri Feb 14, 2020 4:04 pm

Thanks a lot for your advice, I’m off to get some sea foam deep creep, and I will report back
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SS73
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Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2020 8:14 pm
Country: USA
Location: Va

Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:38 am

Update, Finally got to work on this again. Picked up some deep creep, didn’t use the drill method yet. Just the usual soak patch and brush, with a few shots of break free powder blast in between. I did see a little improvement to the barrel end near the muzzle section, but not much effect on the other areas.

Things I noticed:

1) It should not be a machine defect, on the thinner area of the gunk I can “see through” it and see the lands and groves of the rifling. And near the chamber I can see it wear off and show the darker color of the barrel.

2) powder blast/break cleaner is turning the “gunk” white.

3) the gunk seem to be fully hardened, tried to scrape it with a bamboo poker with no effect, it feels like concrete!

Also about the drill method, are you doing this just for the chamber or the entire length of the barrel?

Thanks again
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Arkane
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Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2017 12:35 pm

Tue Feb 18, 2020 12:19 pm

What I think this gunk is a preservative they coat the bore and chamber with after finishing, which I suppose is why a lot of solvents turn it white. I do the drill method in 2 steps. First off - I use 2 different cleaning rods both of which have had their sections screwed in with loctitie red so they ain't going anywhere in bore. I'll use a brand new M16 chamber brush and using the short rod I first shoot the chamber with the deep creep and then work the bore brush into the bore slowly and once I've got it seated move it in and out just a hair (and a slight bit of wobble when it's seated) giving it a shot of deep creep now and then to keep things lubed up.
On the bore I spray the bore down and then insert the rod from the muzzle end and screw on a bore brush at the breech end, shoot the barrel with deep creep again and slowly work the bore brush from muzzle to bore never letting it past the crown under power, giving it a shot of the deep creep along the way to keep it lubed. Unscrew, rinse, and repeat until it's clean. It won't hurt to use non chlorinated brake cleaner to flush things between scrubbings, just give it ample time to evaporate. Afterwards I flush everything and after it's dry give it a good coat of CLP with at least a few hours to allow it to soak into the metal before I run a patch.
The usual warnings: Do your best to keep the rod from coming in contact with the bore, and be extraordinarily careful not to damage the crown. I'm normally pull my flash hider when I do this so I can get a better eye on the crown.
I don't get crazy with the speed, just nice and slow keeping it lubed and ensuring the only things that contact the chamber and bore are the brushes. I didn't do this on my first upper and had problems with cases sticking the first time out even after a good swabbing and light lube. On the rest of my uppers I have used this method before the first range trip and have yet to have any issues with stuck cases.
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